One of the most eye-catching spring flowers, anemones have been a favorite with VW Home & Garden customers for many years. Flowering three months after planting, these easy to grow bulbs bloom profusely throughout the spring, often displaying up to 20 flowers per bulb. These pretty blooms are always a favorite with floral designers.

Here in Whatcom County, you can plant your anemones in either the fall or late winter-early spring. While spring planted corms won’t be quite as prolific as fall-planted ones, a nice harvest can still be had.

When you unpack your anemone corms you’ll notice they resemble shriveled brown acorns, and are probably not what you were expecting. Don’t worry, these strange little critters will actually produce an abundance of striking blooms! Additionally, if you want to add already sprouted plants, we have them now in our garden center.

Before planting, soak corms for 3-5 hours in room temperature water, leaving the water running just slightly during the process to help provide extra oxygen. As the corms soak, they will plump up, often doubling in size.

After soaking, corms can either be planted directly into the ground, or be presprouted. Presprouting the corms before planting will give plants a jump start and you’ll have flowers a few weeks earlier than non-presprouted ones.

Before planting it’s important to prepare the growing beds. We recommend adding a generous dose of compost (2-3″) and balanced organic fertilizer (Nature’s Intent 7-3-4) and mix it thoroughly into the soil. Corms are planted 6″ apart, with 5 rows per bed.

During cold stretches, when temps dip below freezing, cover the plants with a layer of frost cloth.

Anemones normally start to flower about three months after planting. Fall planted corms bloom in early spring and continue steadily for eight to ten weeks. Late winter planted corms will flower by mid spring and continue for about six weeks.

The vase life on anemones is fantastic, often reaching 10 days. Harvest as soon as flowers open and add preservative to the water to ensure that the petals stay brilliantly colored to the end.

X